Foreign Language becomes International Feature Film Award

No doubt it will be a quiz question of the future, but “Roma” will be the last film to win an Academy Award as best Foreign Language Film after the Academy decided to change the category name  to International Feature Film for the 92nd Awards.

“We have noted that the reference to ‘Foreign’ is outdated within the global filmmaking community,” commented Larry Karaszewski and Diane Weyermann, co-chairs of the International Feature Film Committee. “We believe that International Feature Film better represents this category, and promotes a positive and inclusive view of filmmaking, and the art of film as a universal experience.”

The category name change does not change any existing category rules, the submission process, or eligibility requirements.  An international feature film is defined as a feature-length motion picture produced outside the United States of America with a predominantly non-English dialogue track.  Animated and documentary feature films are permitted.  Only one film is accepted from each country as the official selection.

In addition, the shortlist for the International Feature Film award is expanding to ten films; seven to be chosen by the Phase I International Feature Film Committee, and the additional three to be voted by the International Feature Film Award Executive Committee.

The Academy’s Board of Governors has now approved Oscars rules for the 92nd Academy Awards.  Other notable changes and updates include:

In the Animated Feature category, the theatrical release of eight eligible animated features in the calendar year is no longer required for the awards category to be activated.  In addition, nominations voting will be automatically open to all active members of the Short Films and Feature Animation Branch.  Other active voting members of the Academy must opt-in to participate in the nominations round.

In the Makeup and Hairstyling category, the number of nominated films is increasing from three to five, and the shortlist is increasing from seven to ten.  In addition, the bake-off reels for the films shall not exceed seven minutes in total running time.

In the Short Film categories, Animated and Live Action Short Films now have the option to qualify theatrically in either the City of New York or Los Angeles County to be eligible for submission.

The Academy’s Board of Governors voted to maintain Rule Two, Eligibility for the 92nd Oscars.  The rule states that to be eligible for awards consideration, a film must have a minimum seven-day theatrical run in a Los Angeles County commercial theater, with at least three screenings per day for paid admission. Motion pictures released in nontheatrical media on or after the first day of their Los Angeles County theatrical qualifying run remain eligible.

“We support the theatrical experience as integral to the art of motion pictures, and this weighed heavily in our discussions,” said Academy President John Bailey. “Our rules currently require theatrical exhibition, and also allow for a broad selection of films to be submitted for Oscars consideration. We plan to further study the profound changes occurring in our industry and continue discussions with our members about these issues.”

Other amendments to the rules included standard date changes and “housekeeping” adjustments.

Rules are reviewed annually by individual branch and category committees.  The Awards and Events Committee then reviews all proposed changes before presenting its recommendations to the Board of Governors for final approval.

The complete 92nd Academy Awards rules are available at oscars.org/rules.

The 92nd Oscars will be held on Sunday, February 9, 2020, at the Dolby Theatre at Hollywood & Highland Center in Hollywood, and will be televised live on the ABC Television Network at 6:30 p.m. ET/3:30 p.m. PT.  The Oscars also will be televised live in more than 225 countries and territories worldwide.

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91st Academy Award Nomination Notes

347 films released in 2018 were eligible for Best Picture this year, compared to 341 in 2017.

The Academy has 7,902 voting members.

Black Panther is the first comic book-based film to earn a Best Picture nomination. Skippy, nominated for Outstanding Production at the 4th Academy Awards, was based on a comic strip.

A Star Is Born is the fourth film version to receive Academy Award nominations, for a total of 26 nominations. The acting nominations for Bradley Cooper and Lady Gaga are the third for both the lead characters (after Fredric March and Janet Gaynor in 1937, and James Mason and Judy Garland in 1954).

With ten nominations, Roma has tied the record held by Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (2000) for the most nominations received by a foreign language film. It is the tenth foreign language film nominated for Best Picture. Roma is the fifth film to be nominated for both Foreign Language Film and Best Picture in the same year. Each of the previous four (Z, 1969; Life Is Beautiful, 1998; Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, 2000; Amour, 2012) won for Foreign Language Film but not Best Picture.

Alfonso Cuarón is the fourth person to receive four nominations in four different award categories for the same film. Warren Beatty did so twice, with Best Picture, Directing, Leading Actor and Writing nominations for Heaven Can Wait (1978) and Reds (1981). Ethan Coen and Joel Coen received nominations for Best Picture, Directing and Writing and shared a nomination for Film Editing under the pseudonym Roderick Jaynes for No Country for Old Men (2007). Alan Menken received four nominations in two Music categories for Beauty and the Beast (1991).

For the first time, two directors of films nominated in the Foreign Language Film category (Paweł Pawlikowski, Cold War and Alfonso Cuarón, Roma) have received Directing nominations.

Bradley Cooper is the fifteenth person to direct himself to an acting nomination and the ninth to do so on his feature film directing debut.

In the acting categories, eight individuals are first-time nominees (Yalitza Aparicio, Olivia Colman, Marina de Tavira, Adam Driver, Sam Elliott, Richard E. Grant, Regina King, Rami Malek). Five of the nominees are previous acting winners (Mahershala Ali, Christian Bale, Sam Rockwell, Emma Stone, Rachel Weisz). Two were also nominated for acting last year (Willem Dafoe, Sam Rockwell).

Yalitza Aparicio is the second actress nominated for a debut performance in a spoken language other than English. The first was Catalina Sandino Moreno, nominated for her leading role in Maria Full of Grace (2004).

Lady Gaga is the second person to receive acting and song nominations for the same film. Mary J. Blige was the first, with her nominations for Mudbound last year.

The Cinematography nominations for Cold War and Roma mark the first time since 1966 that two black-and-white films have been nominated in the category in a single year. Since 1967, when the Academy eliminated a separate award category for black-and-white cinematography, there have been 15 black-and-white films nominated for Cinematography.

Sandy Powell has the most nominations for Costume Design of any living person with 14. The overall record in the category belongs to Edith Head with 35 nominations.

Shortlists for the 91st Academy Awards

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has announced shortlists in consideration for the 91st Oscars in nine categories: Documentary Feature, Documentary Short Subject, Foreign Language Film, Makeup and Hairstyling, Music (Original Score), Music (Original Song), Animated Short Film, Live Action Short Film and Visual Effects.


DOCUMENTARY FEATURE

  • “Charm City”
  • “Communion”
  • “Crime + Punishment”
  • “Dark Money”
  • “The Distant Barking of Dogs”
  • “Free Solo”
  • “Hale County This Morning, This Evening”
  • “Minding the Gap”
  • “Of Fathers and Sons”
  • “On Her Shoulders”
  • “RBG”
  • “Shirkers”
  • “The Silence of Others”
  • “Three Identical Strangers”
  • “Won’t You Be My Neighbor?”

DOCUMENTARY SHORT SUBJECT

  • “Black Sheep”
  • “End Game”
  • “Lifeboat”
  • “Los Comandos”
  • “My Dead Dad’s Porno Tapes”
  • “A Night at the Garden”
  • “Period. End of Sentence.”
  • “’63 Boycott”
  • “Women of the Gulag”
  • “Zion

FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM

The films, listed in alphabetical order by country, are:

  • Colombia, “Birds of Passage”
  • Denmark, “The Guilty”
  • Germany, “Never Look Away”
  • Japan, “Shoplifters”
  • Kazakhstan, “Ayka”
  • Lebanon, “Capernaum”
  • Mexico, “Roma”
  • Poland, “Cold War”
  • South Korea, “Burning”

MAKEUP AND HAIRSTYLING

  • “Black Panther”
  • “Bohemian Rhapsody”
  • “Border”
  • “Mary Queen of Scots”
  • “Stan & Ollie”
  • “Suspiria”
  • “Vice”

MUSIC (ORIGINAL SCORE)

  • “Annihilation”
  • “Avengers: Infinity War”
  • “The Ballad of Buster Scruggs”
  • “Black Panther”
  • “BlacKkKlansman”
  • “Crazy Rich Asians”
  • “The Death of Stalin”
  • “Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald” “First Man”
  • “If Beale Street Could Talk”
  • “Isle of Dogs”
  • “Mary Poppins Returns”
  • “A Quiet Place”
  • “Ready Player One”
  • “Vice”

MUSIC (ORIGINAL SONG)

  • “When A Cowboy Trades His Spurs For Wings” from “The Ballad of Buster Scruggs”
  • “Treasure” from “Beautiful Boy”
  • “All The Stars” from “Black Panther”
  • “Revelation” from “Boy Erased”
  • “Girl In The Movies” from “Dumplin’”
  • “We Won’t Move” from “The Hate U Give”
  • “The Place Where Lost Things Go” from “Mary Poppins Returns”
  • “Trip A Little Light Fantastic” from “Mary Poppins Returns”
  • “Keep Reachin’” from “Quincy”
  • “I’ll Fight” from “RBG”
  • “A Place Called Slaughter Race” from “Ralph Breaks the Internet”
  • “OYAHYTT” from “Sorry to Bother You”
  • “Shallow” from “A Star Is Born”
  • “Suspirium” from “Suspiria”
  • “The Big Unknown” from “Widows”

ANIMATED SHORT FILM

  • “Age of Sail”
  • “Animal Behaviour”
  • “Bao”
  • “Bilby”
  • “Bird Karma”
  • “Late Afternoon”
  • “Lost & Found”
  • “One Small Step”
  • “Pépé le Morse”
  • “W eekends”

LIVE ACTION SHORT FILM

  • “Caroline”
  • “Chuchotage”
  • “Detainment”
  • “Fauve”
  • “Icare”
  • “Marguerite”
  • “May Day”
  • “Mother”
  • “Skin”
  • “Wale”

VISUAL EFFECTS

  • “Ant-Man and the Wasp”
  • “Avengers: Infinity War”
  • “Black Panther”
  • “Christopher Robin”
  • “First Man”
  • “Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom”
  • “Mary Poppins Returns”
  • “Ready Player One”
  • “Solo: A Star Wars Story”
  • “Welcome to Marwen”

Nominations voting begins on Monday, January 7, 2019 and concludes on Monday, January 14, 2019. Nominations for the 91st Academy Awards will be announced on Tuesday, January 22, 2019.

The 91st Oscars will be held on Sunday, February 24, 2019, at the Dolby Theatre at Hollywood & Highland Center in Hollywood, and will be televised live on the ABC Television Network. The Oscars also will be televised live in more than 225 countries and territories worldwide.

The Facts behind the 90th Academy Award Nominations

The year’s most nominated film, The Shape of Water, is the tenth film in Oscar history to earn thirteen nominations. The current record of fourteen nominations is held by three films, All about Eve (1950), Titanic (1997) and La La Land (2016).

Jordan Peele (Get Out) is the third person to receive Best Picture, Directing and Writing nominations for his first feature film as a director. Warren Beatty did so with Heaven Can Wait (1978), followed by James L. Brooks with Terms of Endearment (1983). (Beatty shared the Directing and Writing nominations with Buck Henry.)

Greta Gerwig (Lady Bird) is the fifth woman nominated for Directing. The other nominated directors are Lina Wertmüller for Seven Beauties (1976), Jane Campion for The Piano (1993), Sofia Coppola for Lost in Translation (2003), and Kathryn Bigelow, who won the award for The Hurt Locker (2009).

Steven Spielberg (The Post) extends his record total of Best Picture nominations for an individual producer with 10. He has also directed 11 Best Picture-nominated films, the most of any living person, and second only to William Wyler’s total of 13.

Rachel Morrison, nominated for Mudbound, is the first woman to receive a nomination for Cinematography. Roger A. Deakins (Blade Runner 2049) has the most nominations for Cinematography of any living person. Charles B. Lang, Jr. and Leon Shamroy share the all-time record with 18 nominations each.

In the acting categories, eight individuals are first-time nominees (Timothée Chalamet, Daniel Kaluuya, Sam Rockwell, Margot Robbie, Mary J. Blige, Allison Janney, Lesley Manville and Laurie Metcalf). Six of the nominees are previous acting winners (Daniel Day-Lewis, Denzel Washington, Christopher Plummer, Frances McDormand, Meryl Streep and Octavia Spencer).

Three of this year’s acting nominees were also nominated last year: Denzel Washington, Meryl Streep and Octavia Spencer.

Meryl Streep (The Post) increases her lead as the most nominated performer with her 21st nomination.

At 88 years old, Christopher Plummer (All the Money in the World) becomes the oldest acting nominee to date. He remains the oldest acting winner, having won for his supporting role in Beginners (2011) at the age of 82.

Lady Bird is the 13th film directed by a woman to be nominated for Best Picture. It is the fourth film written and directed solely by women to receive nominations for Best Picture and Writing. The earlier films were The Piano (1993), Lost in Translation (2003) and Winter’s Bone (2010).

John Williams (Star Wars) adds to his record number of music scoring nominations with his 46th. His overall total of 51 nominations (including five for Original Song) is the most for any living person, and second only to Walt Disney at 59.

Mary H. Ellis, nominated for Baby Driver, is the sixth woman to be nominated for Sound Mixing. The others are Deb Adair (one nomination), Anna Behlmer (10 nominations), Pud Cusack (one nomination), Lora Hirschberg (two nominations, including one award) and Ai-Ling Lee (one nomination in the category).

Best Picture Release Dates in the US:

  • Get Out – February 23, 2017
  • Dunkirk – July 20, 2017
  • Lady Bird – November 2, 2017
  • Three Billboards outside Ebbing, Missouri – November 9, 2017
  • Darkest Hour – November 21, 2017
  • Call Me by Your Name – November 23, 2017
  • The Shape of Water – December 7, 2017
  • The Post – December 22, 2017
  • Phantom Thread – December 24, 2017

 

Oscar Nominations for 90th Academy Awards

The 90th Academy Awards nominations in all 24 Oscar categories will be announced in a two-part, live presentation on Tuesday, January 23, via global live stream on Oscar.comOscars.org, the Academy’s digital platforms, a satellite feed and local broadcasters.

The announcement will combine live presentations from the Academy’s Samuel Goldwyn Theater, with pre-taped category introductions, which will only be featured in the first half of the announcement.

At 5:22 a.m. PST (13.24 GMT), the nominees will be announced in the following categories (in no particular order): Cinematography, Costume Design, Film Editing, Makeup and Hairstyling, Original Score, Production Design, Animated Short Film, Live Action Short Film, Sound Editing, Sound Mixing and Visual Effects.

At 5:38:30 a.m. PST (13.38 GMT), the nominees will be announced in the following categories (n no particular order): Actor in a Leading Role, Actor in a Supporting Role, Actress in a Leading Role, Actress in a Supporting Role, Animated Feature Film, Directing, Documentary Feature, Documentary Short Subject, Foreign Language Film, Original Song, Best Picture, Adapted Screenplay and Original Screenplay.

9 from 83 in the Foreign Language Film category

Screen Shot 2014-12-20 at 17.43.53Nine features have advanced to the next round of voting in the Foreign Language Film category for the 87th Academy Awards.  Eighty-three films had originally been considered in the category.

The films, listed in alphabetical order by country, are:

Argentina, “Wild Tales,” Damián Szifrón, director;

Estonia, “Tangerines,” Zaza Urushadze, director;

Georgia, “Corn Island,” George Ovashvili, director;

Mauritania, “Timbuktu,” Abderrahmane Sissako, director;

Netherlands, “Accused,” Paula van der Oest, director;

Poland, “Ida,” Paweł Pawlikowski, director;

Russia, “Leviathan,” Andrey Zvyagintsev, director;

Sweden, “Force Majeure,” Ruben Östlund, director;

Venezuela, “The Liberator,” Alberto Arvelo, director.

Foreign Language Film nominations for 2014 are being determined in two phases.

The Phase I committee, consisting of several hundred Los Angeles-based Academy members, screened the original submissions in the category between mid-October and 15 December 2014.  The group’s top six choices, augmented by three additional selections voted by the Academy’s Foreign Language Film Award Executive Committee, constitute the shortlist.

The shortlist will be shortened to the category’s five nominees by specially invited committees in New York, Los Angeles and, for the first time, London.  They will spend Friday, January 9, through Sunday, January 11, viewing three films each day and then casting their ballots.

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79 songs are in the running for the Oscar

Screen Shot 2014-12-20 at 17.40.0179 song are in the running for the Oscar for best song at the 87th Academy Awards. The original songs, along with the motion picture in which each song is featured, are listed below in alphabetical order by film title and song title:

“It’s On Again” from “The Amazing Spider-Man 2”
“Opportunity” from “Annie”
“Lost Stars” from “Begin Again”
“Grateful” from “Beyond the Lights”
“Big Eyes” from “Big Eyes”
“Immortals” from “Big Hero 6”
“The Apology Song” from “The Book of Life”
“I Love You Too Much” from “The Book of Life”
“The Boxtrolls Song” from “The Boxtrolls”
“Quattro Sabatino” from “The Boxtrolls”
“Ryan’s Song” from “Boyhood”
“Split The Difference” from “Boyhood”
“No Fate Awaits Me” from “The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby: Them”
“Brave Souls” from “Dolphin Tale 2”
“You Got Me” from “Dolphin Tale 2”
“All Our Endless Love” from “Endless Love”
“Let Me In” from “The Fault in Our Stars”
“Not About Angels” from “The Fault in Our Stars”
“Until The End” from “Garnet’s Gold”
“It Just Takes A Moment” from “Girl on a Bicycle”
“Last Stop Paris” from “Girl on a Bicycle”
“Ordinary Human” from “The Giver”
“I’m Not Gonna Miss You” from “Glen Campbell…I’ll Be Me”
“Find A Way” from “The Good Lie”
“Color The World” from “The Hero of Color City”
“The Last Goodbye” from “The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies”
“Chariots” from “The Hornet’s Nest”
“Follow Me” from “The Hornet’s Nest”
“Something To Shoot For” from “Hot Guys with Guns”
“For The Dancing And The Dreaming” from “How to Train Your Dragon 2”
“Afreen” from “The Hundred-Foot Journey”
“Yellow Flicker Beat” from “The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 1”
“Heart Like Yours” from “If I Stay”
“I Never Wanted To Go” from “If I Stay”
“Mind” from “If I Stay”
“Everything Is Awesome” from “The Lego Movie”
“Call Me When You Find Yourself” from “Life Inside Out”
“Coming Back To You” from “Life of an Actress The Musical”
“The Life Of An Actress” from “Life of an Actress The Musical”
“Sister Rust” from “Lucy”
“You Fooled Me” from “Merchants of Doubt”
“Million Dollar Dream” from “Million Dollar Arm”
“Spreading The Word/Makhna” from “Million Dollar Arm”
“We Could Be Kings” from “Million Dollar Arm”
“A Million Ways To Die” from “A Million Ways to Die in the West”
“Way Back When” from “Mr. Peabody & Sherman”
“America For Me” from “A Most Violent Year”
“I’ll Get You What You Want (Cockatoo In Malibu)” from “Muppets Most Wanted”
“Something So Right” from “Muppets Most Wanted”
“We’re Doing A Sequel” from “Muppets Most Wanted”
“Mercy Is” from “Noah”
“Seeds” from “Occupy the Farm”
“Grant My Freedom” from “The One I Wrote for You”
“The One I Wrote For You” from “The One I Wrote for You”
“Hal” from “Only Lovers Left Alive”
“Shine” from “Paddington”
“Still I Fly” from “Planes: Fire & Rescue”
“Batucada Familia” from “Rio 2”
“Beautiful Creatures” from “Rio 2”
“Poisonous Love” from “Rio 2”
“What Is Love” from “Rio 2”
“Over Your Shoulder” from “Rudderless”
“Sing Along” from “Rudderless”
“Stay With You” from “Rudderless”
“Everyone Hides” from “St. Vincent”
“Why Why Why” from “St. Vincent”
“Glory” from “Selma”
“The Morning” from “A Small Section of the World”
“Special” from “Special”
“Gimme Some” from “#Stuck”
“The Only Thing” from “Third Person”
“Battle Cry” from “Transformers: Age of Extinction”
“Miracles” from “Unbroken”
“Summer Nights” from “Under the Electric Sky”
“We Will Not Go” from “Virunga”
“Heavenly Father” from “Wish I Was Here”
“So Now What” from “Wish I Was Here”
“Long Braid” from “Work Weather Wife”
“Moon” from “Work Weather Wife”

During the nominations process, all voting members of the Music Branch will receive a Reminder List of works submitted in the category and a DVD copy of the song clips.  Members will be asked to watch the clips and then vote in the order of their preference for not more than five achievements in the category.  The five achievements receiving the highest number of votes will become the nominations for final voting for the award.  A maximum of two songs may be nominated from any one film.

To be eligible, a song must consist of words and music, both of which are original and written specifically for the film.  A clearly audible, intelligible, substantive rendition of both lyric and melody must be used in the body of the film or as the first music cue in the end credits.