Academy Museum to open on 14 December 2020

A highlight of the 92nd Academy Awards ceremony was Tom Hanks announcing to the audience in the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles and to millions of broadcast viewers around the world, that the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures will open to the public on Monday, 14 December 2020.

Tom Hanks made the announcement in his capacity as museum trustee and co-chair of the Academy Museum campaign, along with co-chair Annette Bening and chair Bob Iger.

Academy Museum Director Bill Kramer said, “We cannot wait to welcome the whole world to the Academy Museum. When our doors open on December 14, our thrilling combination of exhibitions, screenings, and public and educational programs will create unparalleled experiences for movie lovers everywhere.”

Academy CEO Dawn Hudson said, “The dream of this museum will finally become a reality — a gathering place for filmmakers and movie fans from around the world, where we can share the Oscars legacy and further fulfill the Academy’s mission to connect the world through cinema.”

Commenting on this evening’s announcement, Ron Meyer, chair of the Academy Museum Board of Trustees and Vice Chairman of NBCUniversal, said, “This is a museum that only the Academy could create: exciting and illuminating; historic and contemporary. We look forward to sharing the global reach of cinema.”

Details will continue to unfold as the Museum gets closer to opening. Major construction has been completed on the Academy Museum’s already iconic building, designed by world-renowned architect Renzo Piano and located on Los Angeles’s Miracle Mile. The Academy Museum recently announced that it has reached the 95% mark in its $388 million pre-opening campaign, and installation of four floors of immersive, innovative exhibitions is now beginning.

The Academy Museum will be the world’s premier institution dedicated to the art and science of movies. Located on Wilshire and Fairfax in Los Angeles, the Museum will be simultaneously immersive, experimental, educational, and entertaining. More than a museum, this dynamic film center will offer unparalleled experiences and insights into movies and moviemaking. Designed by Pritzker Prize–winning architect Renzo Piano, the Museum is restoring and revitalizing the historic Saban Building—formerly known as the May Company building (1939)—at the corner of Wilshire Boulevard and Fairfax Avenue. The Saban Building will feature six floors, including exhibition spaces, the 288-seat Ted Mann Theater, the Shirley Temple Education Studio, special event spaces, conservation areas, a café, and store. The new spherical addition will connect to the Saban Building via glass bridges and will feature the state-of-the-art 1,000-seat David Geffen Theater and the rooftop Dolby Family Terrace with its sweeping views of the Hollywood Hills.

Academy Acquires Bela Lugosi’s Iconic Cape from Dracula

The Academy Museum of Motion Pictures has acquired numerous iconic movie costumes over the last year through donations, partial gifts, and purchase. Costume design will be one of the many motion-picture arts explored in the Museum’s inaugural exhibitions.

Among these exceptional additions to the fast-growing collection is the cape that Bela Lugosi wore in his legendary performance as the title character in Dracula (1931). A partial gift from the Lugosi Family, the famed Dracula cape was personally owned by Bela Lugosi after filming the classic. Following the runaway success of the 1931 movie, Lugosi continued to wear the cape on stage and in personal appearances. The cape remained in his possession until his death, and then in the possession of his ex-wife, Lillian Lugosi. Lillian later presented it to her and Bela Lugosi’s son, Bela G. Lugosi.

“My father’s screen-worn cape has had a very special place in my life and in the lives of my children and grandchildren. In fact, it has been a part of my mother’s household and then my household since I was born—for over 80 years,” said Bela G. Lugosi. “After several years of discussions with Founding Director Kerry Brougher, who showed such care and appreciation of its important role in film history, it became clear that there is no better home for the cape than the Academy Museum, allowing movie lovers to view a piece of classic horror film history and enjoy Bela Lugosi’s acclaimed performance for years to come.”

Other major gifts to the Museum include:

• Shirley Temple’s gown, cape, crown, and scepter from The Little Princess (1939), donated by the Family of Shirley Temple Black. Like many of the costumes worn by the child star, whose outfits (unlike those of other actors) could not be easily repurposed for use in other films, they are in near-pristine condition.
• Wedding dress worn by Jennifer Jones in Madame Bovary (1949), donated by the Arnold R. Kunert Collection
• Cloche worn by Debbie Reynolds in Singin’ in the Rain (1952), donated by Lauri Buehler
• Gown worn by Ann Blyth in The King’s Thief (1955), also from the Kunert Collection.

The Museum has also expanded its collection through purchase, acquiring items including:

• Marlene Dietrich’s Helen Faraday evening robe from Blonde Venus (1932)
• Gene Kelly’s sweater and slacks from An American in Paris (1951)
• Sammy Davis, Jr.’s two-piece, black-and-white-patterned Sportin’ Life suit from Porgy and Bess (1959)
• Costumes from The Shining (1980), including the crimson jacket worn by Jack Nicholson
• Black wig with gold trim worn by Elizabeth Taylor as Cleopatra (1963)
• Diana Ross’s Billie Holiday jacket and skirt ensemble from Lady Sings the Blues (1972)
• Richard Pryor’s baseball uniform from The Bingo Long Traveling All-Stars & Motor Kings (1976)
• Black sequined dress worn by Sonia Braga as the title character in Kiss of the Spider Woman (1985)
• Denim and flannel ensemble worn by Kathy Bates in Misery (1990)
• Three-piece, poly-cotton waitress uniform worn by Susan Sarandon in Thelma and Louise (1991)
• Robe and shorts that helped Jeff Bridges transform himself into The Dude in The Big Lebowski (1998)
• Costume worn by Saoirse Ronan as Mary Stuart in Mary Queen of Scots (2018)

79 songs are in the running for the Oscar

Screen Shot 2014-12-20 at 17.40.0179 song are in the running for the Oscar for best song at the 87th Academy Awards. The original songs, along with the motion picture in which each song is featured, are listed below in alphabetical order by film title and song title:

“It’s On Again” from “The Amazing Spider-Man 2”
“Opportunity” from “Annie”
“Lost Stars” from “Begin Again”
“Grateful” from “Beyond the Lights”
“Big Eyes” from “Big Eyes”
“Immortals” from “Big Hero 6”
“The Apology Song” from “The Book of Life”
“I Love You Too Much” from “The Book of Life”
“The Boxtrolls Song” from “The Boxtrolls”
“Quattro Sabatino” from “The Boxtrolls”
“Ryan’s Song” from “Boyhood”
“Split The Difference” from “Boyhood”
“No Fate Awaits Me” from “The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby: Them”
“Brave Souls” from “Dolphin Tale 2”
“You Got Me” from “Dolphin Tale 2”
“All Our Endless Love” from “Endless Love”
“Let Me In” from “The Fault in Our Stars”
“Not About Angels” from “The Fault in Our Stars”
“Until The End” from “Garnet’s Gold”
“It Just Takes A Moment” from “Girl on a Bicycle”
“Last Stop Paris” from “Girl on a Bicycle”
“Ordinary Human” from “The Giver”
“I’m Not Gonna Miss You” from “Glen Campbell…I’ll Be Me”
“Find A Way” from “The Good Lie”
“Color The World” from “The Hero of Color City”
“The Last Goodbye” from “The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies”
“Chariots” from “The Hornet’s Nest”
“Follow Me” from “The Hornet’s Nest”
“Something To Shoot For” from “Hot Guys with Guns”
“For The Dancing And The Dreaming” from “How to Train Your Dragon 2”
“Afreen” from “The Hundred-Foot Journey”
“Yellow Flicker Beat” from “The Hunger Games: Mockingjay – Part 1”
“Heart Like Yours” from “If I Stay”
“I Never Wanted To Go” from “If I Stay”
“Mind” from “If I Stay”
“Everything Is Awesome” from “The Lego Movie”
“Call Me When You Find Yourself” from “Life Inside Out”
“Coming Back To You” from “Life of an Actress The Musical”
“The Life Of An Actress” from “Life of an Actress The Musical”
“Sister Rust” from “Lucy”
“You Fooled Me” from “Merchants of Doubt”
“Million Dollar Dream” from “Million Dollar Arm”
“Spreading The Word/Makhna” from “Million Dollar Arm”
“We Could Be Kings” from “Million Dollar Arm”
“A Million Ways To Die” from “A Million Ways to Die in the West”
“Way Back When” from “Mr. Peabody & Sherman”
“America For Me” from “A Most Violent Year”
“I’ll Get You What You Want (Cockatoo In Malibu)” from “Muppets Most Wanted”
“Something So Right” from “Muppets Most Wanted”
“We’re Doing A Sequel” from “Muppets Most Wanted”
“Mercy Is” from “Noah”
“Seeds” from “Occupy the Farm”
“Grant My Freedom” from “The One I Wrote for You”
“The One I Wrote For You” from “The One I Wrote for You”
“Hal” from “Only Lovers Left Alive”
“Shine” from “Paddington”
“Still I Fly” from “Planes: Fire & Rescue”
“Batucada Familia” from “Rio 2”
“Beautiful Creatures” from “Rio 2”
“Poisonous Love” from “Rio 2”
“What Is Love” from “Rio 2”
“Over Your Shoulder” from “Rudderless”
“Sing Along” from “Rudderless”
“Stay With You” from “Rudderless”
“Everyone Hides” from “St. Vincent”
“Why Why Why” from “St. Vincent”
“Glory” from “Selma”
“The Morning” from “A Small Section of the World”
“Special” from “Special”
“Gimme Some” from “#Stuck”
“The Only Thing” from “Third Person”
“Battle Cry” from “Transformers: Age of Extinction”
“Miracles” from “Unbroken”
“Summer Nights” from “Under the Electric Sky”
“We Will Not Go” from “Virunga”
“Heavenly Father” from “Wish I Was Here”
“So Now What” from “Wish I Was Here”
“Long Braid” from “Work Weather Wife”
“Moon” from “Work Weather Wife”

During the nominations process, all voting members of the Music Branch will receive a Reminder List of works submitted in the category and a DVD copy of the song clips.  Members will be asked to watch the clips and then vote in the order of their preference for not more than five achievements in the category.  The five achievements receiving the highest number of votes will become the nominations for final voting for the award.  A maximum of two songs may be nominated from any one film.

To be eligible, a song must consist of words and music, both of which are original and written specifically for the film.  A clearly audible, intelligible, substantive rendition of both lyric and melody must be used in the body of the film or as the first music cue in the end credits.

New Images of the Academy Museum

IMG_0129The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has released new images of the project for the new Academy Museum.

The new venue will be located on Fairfax and Wilshire, the site of the old Wilshire May Company,  and will be a six-story, 290,000 square-foot museum attached to a 1,000 seater dome for film events. The museum promises visitors a full red-carpet experience, an interactive moviemaking exhibit, and floors dedicated to the history of cinema.

IMG_0126The main theater is expected to be named after David Geffen, who donated $25 million to the museum.  The ground floor of the main building will mainly be a two story interactive exhibit on how to make a film. Visitors will be able to light, film, act, and edit footage themselves. Next to that is a large space for travelling exhibits.

IMG_0128
The second floor of the building will be dedicated to the history of film.

According to the Los Angeles Times this will include

  • Lumière and the Cinématographe
  • Edison and the Kinetoscope and Vitascope
  • the Silent Age of Cinema
  • the rise and influence of the studio system
  • the defining of classic film genres — musicals, westerns, gangster films, horror films
  • the impact of World War II on movie making
  • film noir and the blacklist
  • the impact of TV on the movie industry
  • epics and 3-D
  • the business of moviemaking, including exhibitors, studios, guilds, agencies
  • foreign films
  • teen culture
  • independent cinema

IMG_0127

If all goes to plan, the museum will open in 2017. The site itself, has starred in a number of films, probably most memorably in Volcano (1997).

Volcano

Academy Museum of Motion Pictures unveiled

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has reached its initial goal of $100 million toward a $250 million capital campaign to fund the upcoming Academy Museum of Motion Pictures. Concurrently, the Academy has unveiled its vision for the first major US museum dedicated exclusively to the history and ongoing development of motion pictures. Designed by award-winning architects Renzo Piano and Zoltan Pali, the non-profit museum which will be located in the historic May Company Wilshire building in Los Angeles, and is expected to open in 2016.

Launched in early 2012 by Campaign Chair Bob Iger and Co-Chairs Annette Bening and Tom Hanks, the campaign has raised $100 million through private donations towards a $250 million goal. “The early response to our fundraising campaign has been outstanding and is incredibly encouraging,” said Iger. “We are so grateful to the founding supporters of the campaign, who share our vision and passion for creating the Academy Museum.”

Located on the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) campus, the nearly 300,000 square-foot Academy Museum will revitalize the historic building, which has been vacant or underutilized for nearly 20 years, and weave it back into the fabric of the city.

The design fully restores the Wilshire and Fairfax street-front facades of the 1938 Streamline Moderne building, and includes a spherical glass addition at the back of the original building. Designed to represent the marriage of art and technology, the addition will house a state-of-the-art theater which replaces an extension made to the structure in 1946.

“The design for the museum will finally enable this wonderful building to be animated and contribute to the city after sitting empty for so long,” said Piano, the Pritzker Prize winning architect.  “I am very inspired by the Academy’s name and mission, the idea of the arts and sciences working together to create films. Our design will preserve the May Company building’s historic public profile while simultaneously signaling that the building is taking on a new life that celebrates both the industry and art form that this city created and gave to the world.”

“A major movie museum in the heart of this city has been a long-held dream of the Academy,” said Academy President Hawk Koch, “Thanks to the latest technological developments we can take the visiting public through time, back into our history and forward toward our future.”

Through immersive exhibitions and galleries, special screening rooms, and an interactive education center with demonstration labs, the museum will draw from the Academy’s extensive collections and archives, which include more than 140,000 films, 10 million photographs, 42,000 original film posters, 10,000 production drawings, costumes, props and movie-making equipment, as well as behind-the-scenes personal accounts from artists and innovators – the Academy’s membership – working in the motion picture industry.

“Hollywood has played an unparalleled role in bringing American art, culture and creativity to people around the world,” said Antonio Villaraigosa, mayor of Los Angeles. “The Academy Museum will be a remarkable resource for L.A. that will both celebrate the industry that has defined our city and provide an essential resource that reinforces our position as leader and innovator.”