New Rules for 93rd Academy Awards

The devastating COVID-19 pandemic forced the closure of all Los Angeles County movie theatres as of Monday, March 16, 2020.  Current Academy Awards rules required that for a film to be eligible it had to be shown in a commercial motion picture theatre in Los Angeles County for a theatrical qualifying run of at least seven consecutive days, during which period screenings had to occur at least three times daily. 

Until further notice, and for the 93rd Awards year only, films that had a previously planned theatrical release but are initially made available on a commercial streaming or VOD service may qualify in the Best Picture, general entry and specialty categories for the 93rd Academy Awards under these provisions:

  1. The film must be made available on the secure Academy Screening Room member-only streaming site within 60 days of the film’s streaming or VOD release;
  2. The film must meet all other eligibility requirements.

On a date to be determined by the Academy, and when theaters reopen in accordance with federal, state and local specified guidelines and criteria, this rules exemption will no longer apply.  All films released thereafter will be expected to comply with the standard Academy theatrical qualifying requirements.

“The Academy firmly believes there is no greater way to experience the magic of movies than to see them in a theater.  Our commitment to that is unchanged and unwavering.  Nonetheless, the historically tragic COVID-19 pandemic necessitates this temporary exception to our awards eligibility rules.  The Academy supports our members and colleagues during this time of uncertainty.  We recognize the importance of their work being seen and also celebrated, especially now, when audiences appreciate movies more than ever,” said Academy President David Rubin and CEO Dawn Hudson.

For films to more easily meet theatrical exhibition requirements when theaters reopen, the Academy also will expand the number of qualifying theaters beyond Los Angeles County to include venues in additional U.S. metropolitan areas: the City of New York; the Bay Area; Chicago, Illinois; Miami, Florida; and Atlanta, Georgia.  The Awards and Events Committee will evaluate all matters of rules and eligibility.

Film Festivals

Film festivals that have been impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic may provide films online through either a transactional pay wall or password-protected entry, which will not affect the films’ eligibility for future Academy Awards qualification.  The Academy will allow an exemption for those films that are released online through an impacted festival’s online platform, provided that proof of inclusion in the festival is submitted.  With these provisions, films will be expected to comply with all other eligibility requirements for the 93rd Academy Awards.

The Board of Governors also announced rules changes in the Sound, Music and International Feature Film categories.

• The two Sound categories, Sound Mixing and Sound Editing, have been combined into one award for best achievement in Sound that emphasizes the team effort.  The number of Oscar statuettes remains the same; up to six statuettes may be awarded.  Eligible recipients may include one production sound mixer, two supervising sound editors and three rerecording mixers.

• In the Music (Original Score) category, for a score to be eligible, it must comprise a minimum of 60% original music.  Additionally, for sequels and franchise films, a score must have a minimum of 80% new music.

International Feature Film 

In a procedural change in the International Feature Film category, all eligible Academy members will now be invited to participate in the preliminary round of voting.  For the first time, film submissions will be made available through the Academy Screening Room streaming platform to those members who opt-in.  These members of the International Feature Film Preliminary Voting committee must meet a minimum viewing requirement in order to be eligible to vote in the category.

The following campaign regulations were also approved:

• The regulation prohibiting quotes or comments by Academy members not directly associated with the film in any form of advertising in any medium, including online and social media, was eliminated.  Academy governors and Awards and Events Committee members, however, are still prohibited from participating in such activity.

• All screeners will be required to include closed captioning.

• After nominations, film companies will be allowed to send mailings announcing the availability of song and bake-off materials on the Academy’s streaming platform.

• As part of the Academy’s sustainability effort, the 93rd Awards season will be the final year DVD screeners will be allowed to be distributed; these mailings will be discontinued starting in 2021 for the 94th Academy Awards.  Access to the Academy Screening Room will continue to be made available for all eligible releases.  The distribution of physical music CDs, screenplays and hardcopy mailings, including but not limited to paper invites and screening schedules, will also be discontinued next year.  Digital links to materials will be permitted.

Due to the shifting landscape surrounding the global pandemic caused by COVID-19, all matters of rules and eligibility for the 93rd Academy Awards are subject to change based on national guidelines, state-mandated government orders and Academy-determined best practices.

Additional adjustments to Academy rules, eligibility requirements and scheduling may be required.  As previously announced, the 93rd Oscars telecast is scheduled to air Sunday, February 28, 2021, on ABC.

For the complete 93rd Academy Awards rules, visit oscars.org/rules.

 

92nd Oscars Shortlists

Three hundred forty-four feature films are eligible for the 2019 Academy Awards, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has announced.Nominations for the 92nd Academy Awards will be announced on Monday, January 13, 2020.

The Academy has announced shortlists in consideration for the 92nd Academy Awards in nine categories: Documentary Feature, Documentary Short Subject, International Feature Film, Makeup and Hairstyling, Music (Original Score), Music (Original Song), Animated Short Film, Live Action Short Film and Visual Effects.

DOCUMENTARY FEATURE

Fifteen films advance in the Documentary Feature category for the 92nd Academy Awards®.  One hundred fifty-nine films were submitted in the category. The films, listed in alphabetical order by title, are:

“Advocate”
“American Factory”
“The Apollo”
“Apollo 11”
“Aquarela”
“The Biggest Little Farm”
“The Cave”
“The Edge of Democracy”
“For Sama”
“The Great Hack”
“Honeyland”
“Knock Down the House”
“Maiden”
“Midnight Family”
“One Child Nation”

DOCUMENTARY SHORT SUBJECT

Ten films advance in the Documentary Short Subject category for the 92nd Academy Awards.  Ninety-six films qualified in the category. The films, listed in alphabetical order by title, are:

“After Maria”
“Fire in Paradise”
“Ghosts of Sugar Land”
“In the Absence”
“Learning to Skateboard in a Warzone (If You’re a Girl)”
“Life Overtakes Me”
“The Nightcrawlers”
“St. Louis Superman”
“Stay Close”
“Walk Run Cha-Cha”

INTERNATIONAL FEATURE FILM

Ten Ten films advance to the next round of voting in the International Feature Film category (formerly known as Foreign Language Film) for the 92nd Academy Awards.  Ninety-one films were eligible in the category.The films, listed in alphabetical order by country, are:

Czech Republic, “The Painted Bird”
Estonia, “Truth and Justice”
France, “Les Misérables”
Hungary, “Those Who Remained”
North Macedonia, “Honeyland”
Poland, “Corpus Christi”
Russia, “Beanpole”
Senegal, “Atlantics”
South Korea, “Parasite”
Spain, “Pain and Glory”

MAKEUP AND HAIRSTYLING

Ten films advance in the Makeup and Hairstyling category for the 92nd Academy Awards. The films, listed in alphabetical order by title, are:

“Bombshell”
“Dolemite Is My Name”
“Downton Abbey”
“Joker”
“Judy”
“Little Women”
“Maleficent: Mistress of Evil”
“1917”
“Once upon a Time…in Hollywood”
“Rocketman”

MUSIC (ORIGINAL SCORE)

Fifteen scores advance in the Original Score category for the 92nd Academy Awards.  One hundred seventy scores were eligible in the category. The scores, listed in alphabetical order by film title, are:

“Avengers: Endgame”
“Bombshell”
“The Farewell”
“Ford v Ferrari”
“Frozen II”
“Jojo Rabbit”
“Joker”
“The King”
“Little Women”
“Marriage Story”
“Motherless Brooklyn”
“1917”
“Pain and Glory”
“Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker”
“Us”

MUSIC (ORIGINAL SONG)

Fifteen songs will in the Original Song category for the 92nd Academy Awards.  Seventy-five songs were eligible in the category.  The original songs, along with the motion picture in which each song is featured, are listed below in alphabetical order by film title and song title:

“Speechless” from “Aladdin”
“Letter To My Godfather” from “The Black Godfather”
“I’m Standing With You” from “Breakthrough”
“Da Bronx” from “The Bronx USA”
“Into The Unknown” from “Frozen II”
“Stand Up” from “Harriet”
“Catchy Song” from “The Lego Movie 2: The Second Part”
“Never Too Late” from “The Lion King”
“Spirit” from “The Lion King”
“Daily Battles” from “Motherless Brooklyn”
“A Glass of Soju” from “Parasite”
“(I’m Gonna) Love Me Again” from “Rocketman”
“High Above The Water” from “Toni Morrison: The Pieces I Am”
“I Can’t Let You Throw Yourself Away” from “Toy Story 4”
“Glasgow” from “Wild Rose”

ANIMATED SHORT FILM

Ten films advance in the Animated Short Film category for the 92nd Academy Awards.  Ninety-two films qualified in the category.  The films, listed in alphabetical order by title, are:

“Dcera (Daughter)”
“Hair Love”
“He Can’t Live without Cosmos”
“Hors Piste”
“Kitbull”
“Memorable”
“Mind My Mind”
“The Physics of Sorrow”
“Sister”
“Uncle Thomas: Accounting for the Days”

LIVE ACTION SHORT FILM

Ten films advance in the Live Action Short Film category for the 92nd Academy Awards.  One hundred ninety-one films qualified in the category. The films, listed in alphabetical order by title, are:

“Brotherhood”
“The Christmas Gift”
“Little Hands”
“Miller & Son”
“Nefta Football Club”
“The Neighbors’ Window”
“Refugee”
“Saria”
“A Sister”
“Sometimes, I Think about Dying”

VISUAL EFFECTS

Ten films remain in the running in the Visual Effects category for the 92nd Academy Awards.  The films, listed in alphabetical order by title, are:

“Alita: Battle Angel”
“Avengers: Endgame”
“Captain Marvel”
“Cats”
“Gemini Man”
“The Irishman”
“The Lion King”
“1917”
“Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker”
“Terminator: Dark Fate”

International Feature Film category for the 92nd Academy Awards

Ninety-three countries have submitted films for consideration in the new International Feature Film category (previously Foreign Language) for the 92nd Academy Awards. Ghana, Nigeria and Uzbekistan are first-time entrants. The 2019 submissions, listed in alphabetical order by country, are:

  • Albania, “The Delegation,” Bujar Alimani, director;
  • Algeria, “Papicha,” Mounia Meddour, director;
  • Argentina, “Heroic Losers,” Sebastián Borensztein, director;
  • Armenia, “Lengthy Night,” Edgar Baghdasaryan, director;
  • Australia, “Buoyancy,” Rodd Rathjen, director;
  • Austria, “Joy,” Sudabeh Mortezai, director;
  • Bangladesh, “Alpha,” Nasiruddin Yousuff, director;
  • Belarus, “Debut,” Anastasiya Miroshnichenko, director;
  • Belgium, “Our Mothers,” César Díaz, director;
  • Bolivia, “I Miss You,” Rodrigo Bellott, director;
  • Bosnia and Herzegovina, “The Son,” Ines Tanovic, director;
  • Brazil, “Invisible Life,” Karim Aïnouz, director;
  • Bulgaria, “Ága,” Milko Lazarov, director;
  • Cambodia, “In the Life of Music,” Caylee So, Sok Visal, directors;
  • Canada, “Antigone,” Sophie Deraspe, director;
  • Chile, “Spider,” Andrés Wood, director;
  • China, “Ne Zha,” Yu Yang, director;
  • Colombia, “Monos,” Alejandro Landes, director;
  • Costa Rica, “The Awakening of the Ants,” Antonella Sudasassi Furniss, director;
  • Croatia, “Mali,” Antonio Nuic, director;
  • Cuba, “A Translator,” Rodrigo Barriuso, Sebastián Barriuso, directors;
  • Czech Republic, “The Painted Bird,” Václav Marhoul, director;
  • Denmark, “Queen of Hearts,” May el-Toukhy, director;
  • Dominican Republic, “The Projectionist,” José María Cabral, director;
  • Ecuador, “The Longest Night,” Gabriela Calvache, director;
  • Egypt, “Poisonous Roses,” Ahmed Fawzi Saleh, director;
  • Estonia, “Truth and Justice,” Tanel Toom, director;
  • Ethiopia, “Running against the Wind,” Jan Philipp Weyl, director;
  • Finland, “Stupid Young Heart,” Selma Vilhunen, director;
  • France, “Les Misérables,” Ladj Ly, director;
  • Georgia, “Shindisi,” Dimitri Tsintsadze, director;
  • Germany, “System Crasher,” Nora Fingscheidt, director;
  • Ghana, “Azali,” Kwabena Gyansah, director;
  • Greece, “When Tomatoes Met Wagner,” Marianna Economou, director;
  • Honduras, “Blood, Passion, and Coffee,” Carlos Membreño, director;
  • Hong Kong, “The White Storm 2 Drug Lords,” Herman Yau, director;
  • Hungary, “Those Who Remained,” Barnabás Tóth, director;
  • Iceland, “A White, White Day,” Hlynur Pálmason, director;
  • India, “Gully Boy,” Zoya Akhtar, director;
  • Indonesia, “Memories of My Body,” Garin Nugroho, director;
  • Iran, “Finding Farideh,” Azadeh Moussavi, Kourosh Ataee, directors;
  • Ireland, “Gaza,” Garry Keane, Andrew McConnell, directors;
  • Israel, “Incitement,” Yaron Zilberman, director;
  • Italy, “The Traitor,” Marco Bellocchio, director;
  • Japan, “Weathering with You,” Makoto Shinkai, director;
  • Kazakhstan, “Kazakh Khanate. The Golden Throne,” Rustem Abdrashov, director;
  • Kenya, “Subira,” Ravneet Singh (Sippy) Chadha, director;
  • Kosovo, “Zana,” Antoneta Kastrati, director;
  • Kyrgyzstan, “Aurora,” Bekzat Pirmatov, director;
  • Latvia, “The Mover,” Davis Simanis, director;
  • Lebanon, “1982,” Oualid Mouaness, director;
  • Lithuania, “Bridges of Time,” Audrius Stonys, Kristine Briede, directors;
  • Luxembourg, “Tel Aviv on Fire,” Sameh Zoabi, director;
  • Malaysia, “M for Malaysia,” Dian Lee, Ineza Roussille, directors;
  • Mexico, “The Chambermaid,” Lila Avilés, director;
  • Mongolia, “The Steed,” Erdenebileg Ganbold, director;
  • Montenegro, “Neverending Past,” Andro Martinović, director;
  • Morocco, “Adam,” Maryam Touzani, director;
  • Nepal, “Bulbul,” Binod Paudel, director;
  • Netherlands, “Instinct,” Halina Reijn, director;
  • Nigeria, “Lionheart,” Genevieve Nnaji, director;
  • North Macedonia, “Honeyland,” Ljubo Stefanov, Tamara Kotevska, directors;
  • Norway, “Out Stealing Horses,” Hans Petter Moland, director;
  • Pakistan, “Laal Kabootar,” Kamal Khan, director;
  • Palestine, “It Must Be Heaven,” Elia Suleiman, director;
  • Panama, “Everybody Changes,” Arturo Montenegro, director;
  • Peru, “Retablo,” Alvaro Delgado Aparicio, director;
  • Philippines, “Verdict,” Raymund Ribay Gutierrez, director;
  • Poland, “Corpus Christi,” Jan Komasa, director;
  • Portugal, “The Domain,” Tiago Guedes, director;
  • Romania, “The Whistlers,” Corneliu Porumboiu, director;
  • Russia, “Beanpole,” Kantemir Balagov, director;
  • Saudi Arabia, “The Perfect Candidate,” Haifaa Al Mansour, director;
  • Senegal, “Atlantics,” Mati Diop, director;
  • Serbia, “King Petar the First,” Petar Ristovski, director;
  • Singapore, “A Land Imagined,” Yeo Siew Hua, director;
  • Slovakia, “Let There Be Light,” Marko Skop, director;
  • Slovenia, “History of Love,” Sonja Prosenc, director;
  • South Africa, “Knuckle City,” Jahmil X.T. Qubeka, director;
  • South Korea, “Parasite,” Bong Joon Ho, director;
  • Spain, “Pain and Glory,” Pedro Almodóvar, director;
  • Sweden, “And Then We Danced,” Levan Akin, director;
  • Switzerland, “Wolkenbruch’s Wondrous Journey into the Arms of a Shiksa,” Michael Steiner, director;
  • Taiwan, “Dear Ex,” Mag Hsu, Chih-Yen Hsu, directors;
  • Thailand, “Krasue: Inhuman Kiss,” Sitisiri Mongkolsiri, director;
  • Tunisia, “Dear Son,” Mohamed Ben Attia, director;
  • Turkey, “Commitment Asli,” Semih Kaplanoglu, director;
  • Ukraine, “Homeward,” Nariman Aliev, director;
  • United Kingdom, “The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind,” Chiwetel Ejiofor, director;
  • Uruguay, “The Moneychanger,” Federico Veiroj, director;
  • Uzbekistan, “Hot Bread,” Umid Khamdamov, director;
  • Venezuela, “Being Impossible,” Patricia Ortega, director;
  • Vietnam, “Furie,” Le Van Kiet, director.

Foreign Language becomes International Feature Film Award

No doubt it will be a quiz question of the future, but “Roma” will be the last film to win an Academy Award as best Foreign Language Film after the Academy decided to change the category name  to International Feature Film for the 92nd Awards.

“We have noted that the reference to ‘Foreign’ is outdated within the global filmmaking community,” commented Larry Karaszewski and Diane Weyermann, co-chairs of the International Feature Film Committee. “We believe that International Feature Film better represents this category, and promotes a positive and inclusive view of filmmaking, and the art of film as a universal experience.”

The category name change does not change any existing category rules, the submission process, or eligibility requirements.  An international feature film is defined as a feature-length motion picture produced outside the United States of America with a predominantly non-English dialogue track.  Animated and documentary feature films are permitted.  Only one film is accepted from each country as the official selection.

In addition, the shortlist for the International Feature Film award is expanding to ten films; seven to be chosen by the Phase I International Feature Film Committee, and the additional three to be voted by the International Feature Film Award Executive Committee.

The Academy’s Board of Governors has now approved Oscars rules for the 92nd Academy Awards.  Other notable changes and updates include:

In the Animated Feature category, the theatrical release of eight eligible animated features in the calendar year is no longer required for the awards category to be activated.  In addition, nominations voting will be automatically open to all active members of the Short Films and Feature Animation Branch.  Other active voting members of the Academy must opt-in to participate in the nominations round.

In the Makeup and Hairstyling category, the number of nominated films is increasing from three to five, and the shortlist is increasing from seven to ten.  In addition, the bake-off reels for the films shall not exceed seven minutes in total running time.

In the Short Film categories, Animated and Live Action Short Films now have the option to qualify theatrically in either the City of New York or Los Angeles County to be eligible for submission.

The Academy’s Board of Governors voted to maintain Rule Two, Eligibility for the 92nd Oscars.  The rule states that to be eligible for awards consideration, a film must have a minimum seven-day theatrical run in a Los Angeles County commercial theater, with at least three screenings per day for paid admission. Motion pictures released in nontheatrical media on or after the first day of their Los Angeles County theatrical qualifying run remain eligible.

“We support the theatrical experience as integral to the art of motion pictures, and this weighed heavily in our discussions,” said Academy President John Bailey. “Our rules currently require theatrical exhibition, and also allow for a broad selection of films to be submitted for Oscars consideration. We plan to further study the profound changes occurring in our industry and continue discussions with our members about these issues.”

Other amendments to the rules included standard date changes and “housekeeping” adjustments.

Rules are reviewed annually by individual branch and category committees.  The Awards and Events Committee then reviews all proposed changes before presenting its recommendations to the Board of Governors for final approval.

The complete 92nd Academy Awards rules are available at oscars.org/rules.

The 92nd Oscars will be held on Sunday, February 9, 2020, at the Dolby Theatre at Hollywood & Highland Center in Hollywood, and will be televised live on the ABC Television Network at 6:30 p.m. ET/3:30 p.m. PT.  The Oscars also will be televised live in more than 225 countries and territories worldwide.

91st Academy Award Nomination Notes

347 films released in 2018 were eligible for Best Picture this year, compared to 341 in 2017.

The Academy has 7,902 voting members.

Black Panther is the first comic book-based film to earn a Best Picture nomination. Skippy, nominated for Outstanding Production at the 4th Academy Awards, was based on a comic strip.

A Star Is Born is the fourth film version to receive Academy Award nominations, for a total of 26 nominations. The acting nominations for Bradley Cooper and Lady Gaga are the third for both the lead characters (after Fredric March and Janet Gaynor in 1937, and James Mason and Judy Garland in 1954).

With ten nominations, Roma has tied the record held by Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (2000) for the most nominations received by a foreign language film. It is the tenth foreign language film nominated for Best Picture. Roma is the fifth film to be nominated for both Foreign Language Film and Best Picture in the same year. Each of the previous four (Z, 1969; Life Is Beautiful, 1998; Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, 2000; Amour, 2012) won for Foreign Language Film but not Best Picture.

Alfonso Cuarón is the fourth person to receive four nominations in four different award categories for the same film. Warren Beatty did so twice, with Best Picture, Directing, Leading Actor and Writing nominations for Heaven Can Wait (1978) and Reds (1981). Ethan Coen and Joel Coen received nominations for Best Picture, Directing and Writing and shared a nomination for Film Editing under the pseudonym Roderick Jaynes for No Country for Old Men (2007). Alan Menken received four nominations in two Music categories for Beauty and the Beast (1991).

For the first time, two directors of films nominated in the Foreign Language Film category (Paweł Pawlikowski, Cold War and Alfonso Cuarón, Roma) have received Directing nominations.

Bradley Cooper is the fifteenth person to direct himself to an acting nomination and the ninth to do so on his feature film directing debut.

In the acting categories, eight individuals are first-time nominees (Yalitza Aparicio, Olivia Colman, Marina de Tavira, Adam Driver, Sam Elliott, Richard E. Grant, Regina King, Rami Malek). Five of the nominees are previous acting winners (Mahershala Ali, Christian Bale, Sam Rockwell, Emma Stone, Rachel Weisz). Two were also nominated for acting last year (Willem Dafoe, Sam Rockwell).

Yalitza Aparicio is the second actress nominated for a debut performance in a spoken language other than English. The first was Catalina Sandino Moreno, nominated for her leading role in Maria Full of Grace (2004).

Lady Gaga is the second person to receive acting and song nominations for the same film. Mary J. Blige was the first, with her nominations for Mudbound last year.

The Cinematography nominations for Cold War and Roma mark the first time since 1966 that two black-and-white films have been nominated in the category in a single year. Since 1967, when the Academy eliminated a separate award category for black-and-white cinematography, there have been 15 black-and-white films nominated for Cinematography.

Sandy Powell has the most nominations for Costume Design of any living person with 14. The overall record in the category belongs to Edith Head with 35 nominations.

Shortlists for the 91st Academy Awards

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has announced shortlists in consideration for the 91st Oscars in nine categories: Documentary Feature, Documentary Short Subject, Foreign Language Film, Makeup and Hairstyling, Music (Original Score), Music (Original Song), Animated Short Film, Live Action Short Film and Visual Effects.


DOCUMENTARY FEATURE

  • “Charm City”
  • “Communion”
  • “Crime + Punishment”
  • “Dark Money”
  • “The Distant Barking of Dogs”
  • “Free Solo”
  • “Hale County This Morning, This Evening”
  • “Minding the Gap”
  • “Of Fathers and Sons”
  • “On Her Shoulders”
  • “RBG”
  • “Shirkers”
  • “The Silence of Others”
  • “Three Identical Strangers”
  • “Won’t You Be My Neighbor?”

DOCUMENTARY SHORT SUBJECT

  • “Black Sheep”
  • “End Game”
  • “Lifeboat”
  • “Los Comandos”
  • “My Dead Dad’s Porno Tapes”
  • “A Night at the Garden”
  • “Period. End of Sentence.”
  • “’63 Boycott”
  • “Women of the Gulag”
  • “Zion

FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM

The films, listed in alphabetical order by country, are:

  • Colombia, “Birds of Passage”
  • Denmark, “The Guilty”
  • Germany, “Never Look Away”
  • Japan, “Shoplifters”
  • Kazakhstan, “Ayka”
  • Lebanon, “Capernaum”
  • Mexico, “Roma”
  • Poland, “Cold War”
  • South Korea, “Burning”

MAKEUP AND HAIRSTYLING

  • “Black Panther”
  • “Bohemian Rhapsody”
  • “Border”
  • “Mary Queen of Scots”
  • “Stan & Ollie”
  • “Suspiria”
  • “Vice”

MUSIC (ORIGINAL SCORE)

  • “Annihilation”
  • “Avengers: Infinity War”
  • “The Ballad of Buster Scruggs”
  • “Black Panther”
  • “BlacKkKlansman”
  • “Crazy Rich Asians”
  • “The Death of Stalin”
  • “Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald” “First Man”
  • “If Beale Street Could Talk”
  • “Isle of Dogs”
  • “Mary Poppins Returns”
  • “A Quiet Place”
  • “Ready Player One”
  • “Vice”

MUSIC (ORIGINAL SONG)

  • “When A Cowboy Trades His Spurs For Wings” from “The Ballad of Buster Scruggs”
  • “Treasure” from “Beautiful Boy”
  • “All The Stars” from “Black Panther”
  • “Revelation” from “Boy Erased”
  • “Girl In The Movies” from “Dumplin’”
  • “We Won’t Move” from “The Hate U Give”
  • “The Place Where Lost Things Go” from “Mary Poppins Returns”
  • “Trip A Little Light Fantastic” from “Mary Poppins Returns”
  • “Keep Reachin’” from “Quincy”
  • “I’ll Fight” from “RBG”
  • “A Place Called Slaughter Race” from “Ralph Breaks the Internet”
  • “OYAHYTT” from “Sorry to Bother You”
  • “Shallow” from “A Star Is Born”
  • “Suspirium” from “Suspiria”
  • “The Big Unknown” from “Widows”

ANIMATED SHORT FILM

  • “Age of Sail”
  • “Animal Behaviour”
  • “Bao”
  • “Bilby”
  • “Bird Karma”
  • “Late Afternoon”
  • “Lost & Found”
  • “One Small Step”
  • “Pépé le Morse”
  • “W eekends”

LIVE ACTION SHORT FILM

  • “Caroline”
  • “Chuchotage”
  • “Detainment”
  • “Fauve”
  • “Icare”
  • “Marguerite”
  • “May Day”
  • “Mother”
  • “Skin”
  • “Wale”

VISUAL EFFECTS

  • “Ant-Man and the Wasp”
  • “Avengers: Infinity War”
  • “Black Panther”
  • “Christopher Robin”
  • “First Man”
  • “Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom”
  • “Mary Poppins Returns”
  • “Ready Player One”
  • “Solo: A Star Wars Story”
  • “Welcome to Marwen”

Nominations voting begins on Monday, January 7, 2019 and concludes on Monday, January 14, 2019. Nominations for the 91st Academy Awards will be announced on Tuesday, January 22, 2019.

The 91st Oscars will be held on Sunday, February 24, 2019, at the Dolby Theatre at Hollywood & Highland Center in Hollywood, and will be televised live on the ABC Television Network. The Oscars also will be televised live in more than 225 countries and territories worldwide.

9 from 83 in the Foreign Language Film category

Screen Shot 2014-12-20 at 17.43.53Nine features have advanced to the next round of voting in the Foreign Language Film category for the 87th Academy Awards.  Eighty-three films had originally been considered in the category.

The films, listed in alphabetical order by country, are:

Argentina, “Wild Tales,” Damián Szifrón, director;

Estonia, “Tangerines,” Zaza Urushadze, director;

Georgia, “Corn Island,” George Ovashvili, director;

Mauritania, “Timbuktu,” Abderrahmane Sissako, director;

Netherlands, “Accused,” Paula van der Oest, director;

Poland, “Ida,” Paweł Pawlikowski, director;

Russia, “Leviathan,” Andrey Zvyagintsev, director;

Sweden, “Force Majeure,” Ruben Östlund, director;

Venezuela, “The Liberator,” Alberto Arvelo, director.

Foreign Language Film nominations for 2014 are being determined in two phases.

The Phase I committee, consisting of several hundred Los Angeles-based Academy members, screened the original submissions in the category between mid-October and 15 December 2014.  The group’s top six choices, augmented by three additional selections voted by the Academy’s Foreign Language Film Award Executive Committee, constitute the shortlist.

The shortlist will be shortened to the category’s five nominees by specially invited committees in New York, Los Angeles and, for the first time, London.  They will spend Friday, January 9, through Sunday, January 11, viewing three films each day and then casting their ballots.

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